Gene Simmons worries that men can’t open doors for women anymore. Here’s the truth.

Gene Simmons, a man who became famous by painting his face and sticking his tongue out over loud bubblegum rock, is concerned about the decline of chivalry.

During his stint as the male guest on the Fox News show Outnumbered, Simmons and the female hosts discussed research on the impacts of benevolent sexism—basically, the practice of treating women like they’re helpless and need coddling—and Simmons made an impassioned argument against all those scary feminists who won’t let men open doors for them

Gene Simmons worries that men can’t open doors for women anymore. Here’s the truth..

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Residents urged to apply for Canadian citizenship to avoid hurdles on horizon

| Toronto Star

When Ottawa enacted the new law in June, many, including frontline immigrant settlement workers, assumed it would take effect immediately and that little could be done to beat its more restrictive criteria.

In fact, some of the most controversial changes — requiring citizenship applicantsto be present in Canada for four years out of six (rather than three years out of four), and raising the age of exemption from language and citizenship tests to 65, from 55 — won’t come into force until next June, immigration officials confirmed to the Star.

“We want to tell people it’s not too late, and they should take advantage of the old rules,” said Ann McRae, executive director of the Rexdale legal clinic, a member of the Inter-Clinic Immigration Working Group. Residents urged to apply for Canadian citizenship to avoid hurdles on horizon | Toronto Star.

Why You Should Talk To Strangers …

— PsyBlog

There’s the one about the guy who treats a polite hello as permission to spew out his whole life-story or the woman who looks personally offended and turns her back. Especially when commuting with others on public transport, it often seems to safer to stay in your bubble of solitude.

Are we right to be quite so wary, though?

 According to a new study by shunning the company of strangers we could be missing out on a vital little lift to our day (Epley & Schroeder, 2014).Why You Should Talk To Strangers — PsyBlog.

Tips on how to survive a midlife crisis …

| Life | Life & Style | Daily Express

Midlife is a time of transition for women: our children no longer rely on us and will soon leave home, leaving us to wonder “who am I now?”; we may face separation or divorce; our parents are ageing and we have health scares.

We can face all these challenges with heavy hearts and resentment, or we can embrace this new phase in our lives with enthusiasm.

One miserable day after the end of my 21-year marriage, years of tears and grief came flooding out of me. Then a text came in from a girlfriend with the words: “All I can say is it gets better. Go gently, be kind to yourself, and best knickers always.

Tips on how to survive a midlife crisis | Life | Life & Style | Daily Express.

Why is Canada the most tolerant country in the world? Luck

The Globe and Mail

Is Canada the most tolerant place in the world because Canadians are more enlightened than others? The answer is no. Accidents of geography and history account for our blessings.

Some may dispute the premise of the question above, but I do believe that Canada can make an honest claim to being the most open-minded and open-hearted place on earth. For two decades now, a land once occupied by descendants of European settlers has been importing just under 1 per cent of its population annually – 258,000 in 2012, more than five million in total – with most new arrivals coming from Asia and the Pacific. No other country on earth has done such a thing. No country brings in as many immigrants as we do, on a per capita basis, from as many different places. And we all get along with each other amazingly well.

Why is Canada the most tolerant country in the world? Luck – The Globe and Mail.

Trans people, the awkward questions they face, and how they answer

| National Post

At a party, in a checkout line or out to dinner, transgender model Arisce Wanzer has this to say about routine, uncomfortable questions from strangers and acquaintances:

“Why are you jumpin’ into my underwear from the get-go?” We asked Wanzer, 27, in Los Angeles and two other trans people — Janet Mock, 31, and Joy Ladin, 53, to share how they handle chance, intrusive encounters.

“As an educator, I believe it’s really important for people to ask questions, but at the same time I’m a person and not a public billboard,” said Ladin, an English professor at Yeshiva University in New York and author of Through the Door of Life: A Jewish Journey between Genders.

Added Mock, whose memoir Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More was released in February: “It’s just so interesting to me how we’re just kind of stripped of that common human decency.

Trans people, the awkward questions they face, and how they answer | National Post.

How rising housing prices are breeding a new form of inequality

The Globe and Mail

Treating the $990,000 asking price as a mere suggestion, the buyers would eventually pay $1.3-million for the house – a 53-per-cent premium over what it sold for just three years ago.

This is part of the new reality in frothy markets, such as Toronto and Vancouver, where an average home will set you back more than $1-million.

The Bank of Canada fretted last week, in its semi-annual review of the health of the financial system, about all the various risks that could cause the country’s housing market to unravel. Among them: rising long-term interest rates, a sharp rise in unemployment, a condo price crash in Toronto, and a Chinesebanking crisis.

How rising housing prices are breeding a new form of inequality – The Globe and Mail.

Private corporations helping widen inequality gulf: study

The Globe and Mail

Income inequality in Canada is more pronounced than previously believed, a new report reveals, because many of the country’s wealthiest people are funnelling their income through private companies that are not included in standard measures of individual earnings.

A study by three leading academics says Canada’s top 1 per cent ofincome earners took home an average of $500,200 in 2011 – including income from private corporations they control directly or indirectly through holding companies. That is 39 per cent more than the $359,000 figure calculated when traditional individual income tax data are used.

Private corporations helping widen inequality gulf: study – The Globe and Mail.

Birth rate stalls after recession, hurting economic growth

Based on ‘Business’ – CBC News

We tend to think economic growth comes from working harder and smarter. But economists attribute up to a third of it to more people joining the workforce each year than leaving it. The result is more producing, earning and spending.

Now this secret fuel of the economy, rarely missing and little noticed, is running out.

“For the first time since World War II, we’re no longer getting a tailwind,” says Russ Koesterich, chief investment strategist at Blackrock, the world’s largest money manager. “You’re going to create fewer jobs. … All else equal, wage growth will be slower.”

Births are falling in China, Japan, the United States, Germany, Italy and nearly all other European countries. Studies have shown that births drop when unemployment rises, such as during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Birth rates have fallen the most in some regions that were hardest hit by the financial crisis.

Birth rate stalls after recession, hurting economic growth – Business – CBC News.