14 Things Successful People Do On Weekends

Forbes.com:

Spencer Rascoff is only 37. Yet the Harvard grad and father of three has already accomplished so much.

“My weekends are an important time to unplug from the day-to-day and get a chance to think more deeply about my company and my industry,” Rascoff says. “Even when I’m technically not working, I’m always processing in the background and thinking about the company. Weekends are a great chance to reflect and be more introspective about bigger issues.”

He says he always spends weekends with his family. “Even if I’m on the road on a Friday and have to be back in that same city the following week, I always come home no matter what.”

14 Things Successful People Do On Weekends.

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8 Steps to Like Yourself (More)

| World of Psychology

Notice the word “like.” I’m not going to be so bold as to introduce eight steps that will have you love yourself. Baby steps, right?

For some, self-love is a no-brainer. They grew up in homes where LOVE was the predominant four-letter word. Some possess too much, and like Vanity Smurf, are most comfortable with a mirror in hand. These are the loud talkers, who think that everyone 20 feet behind and ahead of them should hear what’s on their mind.

8 Steps to Like Yourself (More) | World of Psychology.

Why You Should Talk To Strangers …

— PsyBlog

There’s the one about the guy who treats a polite hello as permission to spew out his whole life-story or the woman who looks personally offended and turns her back. Especially when commuting with others on public transport, it often seems to safer to stay in your bubble of solitude.

Are we right to be quite so wary, though?

 According to a new study by shunning the company of strangers we could be missing out on a vital little lift to our day (Epley & Schroeder, 2014).Why You Should Talk To Strangers — PsyBlog.

Study: Less-Structured Time Correlates to Kids’ Success

Based on  TIME Reports:

Research found that young children who spend more time engaging in more open-ended, free-flowing activities display higher levels of executive functioning, and vice versa.

Parents, drop your planners—a new psychological study released Tuesday found that children with less-structured time are likely to show more “self-directed executive functioning,” otherwise known as the “cognitive processes that regulate thought and action in support of goal-oriented behavior.”

“Executive function is extremely important for children,” Yuko Munakata, a professor in the psychology and neuroscience department at the university of Colorado, Boulder  told EurekAlert!. “It helps them in all kinds of ways throughout their daily lives, from flexibly switching between different activities rather than getting stuck on one thing, to stopping themselves from yelling when angry, to delaying gratification. Executive function during childhood also predicts important outcomes, like academic performance, health, wealth and criminality, years and even decades later.”

Study: Less-Structured Time Correlates to Kids’ Success | TIME.

New centre helps struggling mothers go beyond stigma of mental health

The Globe and Mail

Getting parenting support is tough at the best of times, but especially challenging for women struggling with mental-health issues. Now a first-of-its-kind centre that dispenses with the need for formal referrals to a child psychiatrist, long wait times and fees is helping women be better moms.

Launched in January by Women’s College Hospital, but only officially announced this month, the Toronto centre – a pilot project – offers advice on helping kids overcome everything from sleep and eatingdisorders to sibling rivalry.

New centre helps struggling mothers go beyond stigma of mental health – The Globe and Mail.

Freedom from Depression – Beyond Meds

freedom f dDr. James S. Gordon, the founder and director of the Center for Mind-Body Medicine and a clinical professor at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, speaks with Tami Simon about self-healing strategies for overcoming depression. Dr. Gordon is the author of Unstuck, and with Sounds True he has created the six-session audio program Freedom from Depression: A Practical Guide for the Journey. In this episode, Tami speaks with Dr. Gordon about the actual research on antidepressants and their effectiveness, the importance of breaking the taboo around talking about our suicidal thoughts, and which mind-body practices are most powerful for helping people experiencing severe depression. (57 minutes) To listen click on the link below….

Freedom from Depression – Beyond Meds.

 

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No Limits: Nick Vujicic

 

“Nick” Vujicic (voy-i-chich is an Australian Christian evangelist andmotivational speaker born with tetra-amelia syndrome, a rare disorder characterised by the absence of all four limbs. As a child, he struggled mentally and emotionally as well as physically, but eventually came to terms with his disability and, at the age of seventeen, started his own non-profit organisation, Life Without Limbs.

This is one of  Vujicic’s motivational speeches at Singapore . He travels around the world and his speeches are focused on life with a disability, hope and finding meaning in life. He also speaks about his belief that God can use any willing heart to do his work and that God is big enough to overcome any disability.

nick vc

How Emotionally Intelligent Are You? Here’s How To Tell

Based on Huff Post feed By 

What makes some people more successful in work and life than others? IQ and work ethic are important, but they don’t tell the whole story. Our emotional intelligence — the way we manage emotions, both our own and those of others — can play a critical role in determining our happiness and success.

Plato said that all learning has some emotional basis, and he may be right. The way we interact with and regulate our emotions has repercussions in nearly every aspect of our lives. To put it in colloquial terms, emotional intelligence (EQ) is like “street smarts,” as opposed to “book smarts,” and it’s what accounts for a great deal of one’s ability to navigate life effectively.

“What having emotional intelligence looks like is that you’re confident, good at working towards your goals, adaptable and flexible. You recover quickly from stress and you’re resilient,” Daniel Goleman, psychologist and author of Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence, tells The Huffington Post. “Life goes much more smoothly if you have good emotional intelligence.”

The five components of emotional intelligence, as defined by Goleman, are self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, social skills and empathy. We can be strong in some of these areas and deficient in others, but we all have the power to improve any of them.

How Emotionally Intelligent Are You? Here’s How To Tell.