Gene Simmons worries that men can’t open doors for women anymore. Here’s the truth.

Gene Simmons, a man who became famous by painting his face and sticking his tongue out over loud bubblegum rock, is concerned about the decline of chivalry.

During his stint as the male guest on the Fox News show Outnumbered, Simmons and the female hosts discussed research on the impacts of benevolent sexism—basically, the practice of treating women like they’re helpless and need coddling—and Simmons made an impassioned argument against all those scary feminists who won’t let men open doors for them

Gene Simmons worries that men can’t open doors for women anymore. Here’s the truth..

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Researchers create formula that predicts happiness

The Globe and Mail

Are you happy? Scientists suggest they can compute the answer.

A team of researchers at University College London have come up with a new one-line equation to predict people’s happiness from moment to moment.

Their work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offers a mathematical solution to explain a fickle and elusive human emotion.

Researchers create formula that predicts happiness – The Globe and Mail.

Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience, Human Development Report 2014

Human Development Reports | United Nations Development Programme.

The 2014 Human Development Report – Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience provides a fresh perspective on vulnerability and proposes ways to strengthen resilience.

According to income-based measures of poverty, 1.2 billion people live with $1.25 or less a day. However, according to the UNDP Multidimensional Poverty Index, almost 1.5 billion people in 91 developing countries are living in poverty with overlapping deprivations in health, education and living standards. And although poverty is declining overall, almost 800 million people are at risk of falling back into poverty if setbacks occur. Many people face either structural or life-cycle vulnerabilities.

Human Development Reports | United Nations Development Programme.

Anxiety Symptoms: 10 Common Signs To Watch Out For

By HUFFPOST LIVING CANADA

According to Statistics Canada, anxiety is one of the most prevalent mental health disorders in the country and is usually chronic and generally lasts at least six months.If left untreated, anxiety can get worse over time and people may not feel comfortable doing day-to-day routines like going to work or openly communicating with their partners.

While there are several symptoms of anxiety, Masand says they can be broken down to psychological and physical ones. Everything from irregular sleeping patterns to constantly fearing something in your life may be signs of anxiety disorder.

Masand says there are also several misconceptions about anxiety in the medical world. He believes not all forms of anxiety can be harmful, but rather they can help us stay focused and productive when we’re dealing with fears, for example. People suffering from anxiety, however, are also aware of the stigma. Telling someone to“calm down” or relating to them with your own stress, can all be viewed as annoying and unhelpful to someone with anxiety.

Anxiety Symptoms: 10 Common Signs To Watch Out For.

Related reading from around the Web:

 Anxiety Symptoms – Anxiety Attacks
 15 Small Steps You Can Take Today to Improve Anxiety Symptoms …
 Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Get the Facts on Symptoms
 Anxiety symptoms, panic attacks symptoms and treatment of anxiety …
 Symptoms | Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA

 Stress and anxiety: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

 

How cultures around the world think about parenting …

| ideas.ted.com

The crisis of American parenting, as anyone who has looked at the parenting section of a bookstore can attest, is that nobody knows what the hell they’re doing. Yet despite this lack of confidence and apparent absence of knowledge, many American parents zealously believe that their choices carve out their children’s futures. Indeed, they seek the advice of expert after expert in the field in order to succeed at one goal: to raise the happiest, the most successful, and the most well-adjusted leaders of the future.

But what dangers lay in thinking that there is one “right” way to parent? How much of how we parent is actually dictated by our culture? How do the ways we parent express the essentialness of who we are, as a nation?

How cultures around the world think about parenting | ideas.ted.com.

Mental Health: Anti-stigma campaigns produce unintended consequences

| OPSEU Diablogue

There is no question that stigma is an obstacle to those seeking help for mental illness.

The question is, once mental illness is accepted in the same way as any other medical malady, will there be sufficient resources in place to deal with those who do come forward?

Alan Stevenson of the Canadian Mental Health Association recently told the Sarnia Observer that his agency is seeing yearly jumps in the number of people coming forward with anxiety and depression largely due to the success of anti-stigma campaigns.

Mental Health: Anti-stigma campaigns produce unintended consequences | OPSEU Diablogue.

Tips on how to survive a midlife crisis …

| Life | Life & Style | Daily Express

Midlife is a time of transition for women: our children no longer rely on us and will soon leave home, leaving us to wonder “who am I now?”; we may face separation or divorce; our parents are ageing and we have health scares.

We can face all these challenges with heavy hearts and resentment, or we can embrace this new phase in our lives with enthusiasm.

One miserable day after the end of my 21-year marriage, years of tears and grief came flooding out of me. Then a text came in from a girlfriend with the words: “All I can say is it gets better. Go gently, be kind to yourself, and best knickers always.

Tips on how to survive a midlife crisis | Life | Life & Style | Daily Express.

Trans people, the awkward questions they face, and how they answer

| National Post

At a party, in a checkout line or out to dinner, transgender model Arisce Wanzer has this to say about routine, uncomfortable questions from strangers and acquaintances:

“Why are you jumpin’ into my underwear from the get-go?” We asked Wanzer, 27, in Los Angeles and two other trans people — Janet Mock, 31, and Joy Ladin, 53, to share how they handle chance, intrusive encounters.

“As an educator, I believe it’s really important for people to ask questions, but at the same time I’m a person and not a public billboard,” said Ladin, an English professor at Yeshiva University in New York and author of Through the Door of Life: A Jewish Journey between Genders.

Added Mock, whose memoir Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More was released in February: “It’s just so interesting to me how we’re just kind of stripped of that common human decency.

Trans people, the awkward questions they face, and how they answer | National Post.

Diversity Is Useless Without Inclusivity

By Christine M. Riordan in Harvard Business Review

Over the past decade, organizations have worked hard to create diversity within their workforce. Diversity can bring many organizational benefits, including greater customer satisfaction, better market position, successful decision-making, an enhanced ability to reach strategic goals, improved organizational outcomes, and a stronger bottom line.

However, while many organizations are better about creating diversity, many have not yet figured out how to make the environment inclusive—that is, create an atmosphere in which all people feel valued and respected and have access to the same opportunities.

That’s a problem.(Read…)

Diversity Is Useless Without Inclusivity – Christine M. Riordan – Harvard Business Review.

Could WiFi in schools be harming our kids?

– The Globe and Mail

Students in Lindsay Freedman’s split Grade 3/4 class at Red Willow Public School are working away on tablets, laptops and iPods. It’s Bring Your Own Device day, a regular occurrence here, and supplementing the devices brought from home are 20 school-owned iPads. Freedman walks around the classroom, marvelling at her students’ instant embrace of the online presentation app she’s just introduced. “They’re an instant motivator,” she says, referring to the tools in their hands.

Could WiFi in schools be harming our kids? – The Globe and Mail.